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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 162-166

Effect of Body Mass Index, Smoking, and Aspirin Administration on Polycythemia Incidences


1 Department of Nutrition, The Medical Technical Institute of Baghdad, The Middle Technical University, Baghdad, Iraq
2 Department of X-ray Techniques, The Medical Technical Institute of Baghdad, The Middle Technical University, Baghdad, Iraq

Correspondence Address:
Adnan H Mahmood
Department of Nutrition, The Medical Technical Institute of Baghdad, The Middle Technical University, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijnpnd.ijnpnd_46_18

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Aims: Polycythemia is an increase in red cell mass as evidenced by increase in hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit, and number of circulating erythrocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of some clinical manifestation on the occurrence of polycythemia including overweight, smoking, meat consumption, chronic diseases, previous history, family history, recurrent blood donation, and aspirin administration. Materials and Methods: This study was performed at The Iraqi National Blood Bank in Baghdad. Data including weight, height, and Hb levels were estimated personally from 80 patients attending on three different days at the bank for blood donation. Each of the patients were asked about having clinical manifestation tested in this study. Results: Hb levels were slightly elevated when body mass index values were increased. Approximately 61% of patients having high Hb levels were meat consumers compared to nonmeat consumers who did not have high Hb levels. About 36% of patients who had high Hb levels were smokers compared to 11% who were nonsmokers. A total of 17% of patients having high Hb levels were taking aspirin in comparison to 26% who were not taking this drug. Chronic diseases, family history, previous history, or recurrent donation seem to have unclear effect on Hb levels. Conclusion: Smoker and overweight people seemed to have higher Hb levels, whereas aspirin administration led to decreasing Hb levels. Other manifestation had little or no relationship with Hb levels.


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