Users Online: 168

Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size

Home | About us | Editorial board | Search | Ahead of print | Current issue | Archives | Submit article | Instructions | Subscribe | Contacts | Login 
     
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 142-146

A study of protein energy malnutrition in the school girls of a rural population


Department of Biochemistry, Vivekanandha College of Arts and Sciences for Women, Elayampalayam, Thiruchengode - 637 205, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Manikandan Krishnan
Department of Biochemistry, Vivekanandha College of Arts and Sciences for Women, Elayampalayam, Thiruchengode - 637 205, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2231-0738.95985

Rights and Permissions

India has shown remarkable progress and has a number of nutrition intervention programs, but malnutrition remains highly prevalent in the poor states of the country. Malnutrition results due to imbalance between the needs of the body and the intake of nutrients. In India, gender inequality in nutrition is present from infants to adulthood. Women and girls never reach their full growth potential due to nutritional deprivation. It may be due to poverty, lack of awareness and illiteracy. In the present study, Protein Energy Malnutrition (PEM) in the school girls from rural areas was measured. Moderate and severe malnutrition was observed in the 11-13 and 13-15 age groups of girls. Anemia was found to be higher in the 17-19 age groups of girls. In additional the illiteracy of the mothers and the occupation of fathers of the girls analyzed were studied and it was found that these conditions may be the main reason for the PEM and anemic condition. A wide variety of development actions are needed to improve the food security and nutrition of women. Prevalence of malnutrition along with anemia, and common ailments in an urban slum of India's modern city highlights the significance of developing integrated child illness management programs for the urban poor and strengthening nutrition intervention programs.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed9498    
    Printed161    
    Emailed3    
    PDF Downloaded613    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal