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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 53-56

Reduced levels of antioxidant proteins in children with autism in Oman


1 Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Agriculture and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman; Neuropharmacology Group, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medical Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
2 Neuropharmacology Group, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medical Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
3 Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Agriculture and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman
4 Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman

Correspondence Address:
Musthafa M Essa
Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, CAMS, Sultan Qaboos University, PO No: 34, Al-Khoud, Muscat, Postal Code: 123, Sultanate of Oman

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Source of Support: Sultan Qaboos University; Oman, in the form of internal grant is gratefully acknowledged (IG/AGR/FOOD/11/02)., Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2231-0738.93136

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Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a severe neuro-developmental disorder with poorly understood etiology. Numerous studies evidenced that oxidative stress and altered antioxidant status could be involved in the pathophysiology of ASD. It is also reported that the altered levels of antioxidant proteins such as ceruloplasmin (copper-binding protein) and transferrin (iron-binding protein) could enhance the oxidative stress directly or indirectly and it can considerably retard acquired language skills in autistic children. But these types of studies in children with autism in Oman were not available. Materials and Methods: To reveal this paradigm, in this study, we evaluated the plasma levels of ceruloplasmin and transferrin in Omani autistic children and compared the results with age matched control children (n = 20). Results: In accordance with the previous reports, significantly lower plasma levels of ceruloplasmin and of transferrin were observed in Omani autistic children as compared to normal children. Conclusion: This suggests that such changes may lead to abnormalities of iron and copper metabolism, resulting in the enhancement of the oxidative stress and contributing to the pathogenesis of ASD. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear and further extensive studies are warranted.


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