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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 56-63

Mood dysfunction and health-related quality of life among type 2 diabetic patients in Oman: Preliminary study


1 Department of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, sultan Qaboos University, P. O. Box 35, Al-Khoudh 123, Muscat, Oman
2 Department of Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
3 Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, sultan Qaboos University, P. O. Box 35, Al-Khoudh 123, Muscat, Oman
4 Department of Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, sultan Qaboos University, P. O. Box 35, Al-Khoudh 123, Muscat, Oman
5 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P. O. Box 35, Al-Khoudh 123 Muscat, Oman

Correspondence Address:
Samir Al-Adawi
Department of Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 35, Al-Khoudh 123, Muscat
Oman
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Source of Support: The economic and social research council (RES-060-25-0010), Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2231-0738.77533

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Aim: A temporal relationship exists between the presence of affective disturbance, poor glycaemic control and complications in people with type-2 diabetes. The objective of this study is to compare the performance of patients diagnosed with type-2 diabetes and normoactive group on indices of mood functioning and indices of health-related quality of life. Materials and Methods: In 2006-2007, for a six-month period, diabetics from Oman were screened for the presence of propensity towards psychiatric distress using Self-Reporting Questionnaire during their routine consultation at the diabetic clinic at a tertiary care hospital in an urban area of Oman. Those who fulfilled presently operationalised criteria for subclinical propensity towards affective disorders were further screened for affective functioning (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and indices of general well-being or health-related quality of life (Nottingham Health Profile). The age- and sex-matched controls group (n=40) underwent the same procedure. Results: Both measurement scales used in the present study indicated that the diabetic group had significantly poorer quality of life and higher distress level than the non-diabetic group, with the exception of emotional reaction for which the non-diabetics showed poorer health than the diabetics. Additionally, no difference between groups was found when compared for social isolation. Conclusions: In agreement with previous studies from different populations, people with diabetes in Oman appear to have marked affective functioning and impairment based on the indices of quality of life. The present finding is discussed within a sociocultural context that has a direct bearing on the situation in Oman.


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